Exterior House Painting Trends Throughout History

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It’s common today to see a wide array of building materials and colors on residential homes when driving down the street. However, that wasn’t always the case.

If you are considering changing the look and/or color of your home’s facade, it can help to have some historical context for exterior house painting trends. This is particularly true if your home is considered to be historic.

house painting

Colors (or a Lack Thereof)

Before the Revolutionary War, American homeowners did not use paint. Instead, the building materials themselves – white pine, white oak and white cedar, were both attractive and durable.

In the early 1800s, homeowners began using paints to color the exteriors of their homes, however these colors were usually limited to those derived from natural elements like colored clays, red iron oxide and lamp black. While there were some chemical-based blue and green colors available at this time, they were too expensive for the average homeowner. What’s more, the colors weren’t necessarily stable and could change.

In the mid-1850s, synthetic dyes and pigments were created. For the first time, regular homeowners had access to – and could afford – colored paint to change the look of their homes. Fast forward to the mid-late 20th century, when consumers could have specific paint colors mixed right in the store, giving homeowners the chance to have a custom color for the outside of their home.

Choosing House Painting Colors Based on House Style

If you are painting a house that was built before 1920 and want to use a white paint, consider instead using an off-white color, which is what would have been available to homeowners at that time.

If your home dates back to the latter part of the eighteenth century, you might consider house painting using earth tones and monochromatic schemes with your trim and siding. Colors available at that time were deep yellows, browns, grays, and reds.

Between about 1790 and 1840, homeowners favored off-white and cream colors for their homes’ exteriors, mimicking classic Roman and Greek themes. Homes from this period with shutters usually had a copper-based green paint, standing in sharp contrast to the home’s light color.

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Technology is Revolutionizing Exterior House Painting

Regardless of what color you want on the outside of your house, there’s a better way to get an attractive exterior today. Gone are the days of having to scrape and paint your house every few years to keep it looking nice.

Rhino Shield is a revolutionary product that is better than paint. In fact, homeowners who use Rhino Shield can go 25 years before having to paint their home again! Its application is not limited to wood siding, either. You can also use Rhino shield on brick, stucco, metal and vinyl surfaces to provide lasting protection.

When you choose Rhino Shield, you can count on prompt service, professional and experienced installers and skilled workmanship. To learn more about this versatile house painting product, contact your local office today at 877-678-2054, or request a free estimate online.

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